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Albion Row

History of Albion Row

Albion Row seems to have been completely transformed since the early 20th century. Then most houses were along the north side.

1871:

(1)

William P Burgess, 26, college porter, b Cambridge

(2)

Frederick W Fortin, widower, 40, carpenter, b Hinxton

Edith, 10, b Cambridge

Eliana, 8, b Cambridge

Bridget Furbank, servant, 23, b Cottenham

Frederick Fortin married Sarah Green of (3) and they lived at 102 Sturton Street

(3)

Charlotte F Ellis, 30, governess of infant school, b Swavesey

Sarah Green, 32, governess of infant school, b Littlebury Essex

Eliza Storey, servant, 18, b Great Gransden

(3)

James Smee, 56, serjeamt at mace, b Cambridge

(4)

Sarah Finkill, 60, b Cambridge

(5)

Maurice Pike, 30, iron moulder, b Norfolk

(6)

(7)

(8)

(9)

(10)

(11)


1913:

NORTH SIDE

  1. Henry Sergeant, labourer
  2. William Burgess, college servant

SS. Gile’s and Peter’s Infants’ Schools and Playground: Mrs Shead, mistress

3. Mrs Jane Fox

4. Ernest Hibbitt

5. H Simms, labourer

6. Mrs Mallyon

7. William White

8. Mrs Williams

9. William Bement

10. James Curtis, labourer

11. Herbert Walter Ankin, labourer

SOUTH SIDE

13. Stella Cottage

Alfred James Lawrence

14.

George Wheeler

15.

Mrs Richardson

16.

Charles Bonnett, builder

17.

Arthur Samuel, foreman gas fitter


1916:

16. Leonard Charles Sparkes: Private NM/2/177157, M.T. Company, Royal Army Service Corps. Died of wounds in the United Kingdom 4 July 1916. Aged 32. Husband of Emma Sparkes, of 16, Albion Row, St. Peter’s St., Cambridge. Leonard had previously lived at 37 Abbey Walk.


1962:

NORTH SIDE

  1. vacant

2. Cyril H Starvis

3. Mrs Ship

4/5. Arthur L Winfield

6. vacant

7. vacant

8. Mrs E Wright

9. vacant

10. Mrs R Juler

11. Vernon A Doggett

SOUTH SIDE

12. Mrs E F Cole

13. George H Hatton

14. Arthur Caskin

15. Miss E Chapman

16. Walter Housden

17. Edward S Forster


1981:

3. George Hatton

 

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