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233 – 235 (161) High Street, Cottenham

History of 233 - 235 High Street

1841:

Thomas Chivers, 48, wheelwright

 

John Willson, 35, shepherd

 

Reuben Royston, 40, ag.lab.

 

John Chivers, 25

 

John Chivers, 60


1850:

John Chivers

House burned by 1850 fire.


1851:

John Chivers, 39, farm of 50 acres employing 2 labourers

 

Thomas Chivers, 59, land proprietor, b Cottenham


1861:

John Chivers, 48, farmer of 50 acres employing 2 men

 

Thomas Chivers, 25, farmers son


1871:

John Chivers, 59, farmer of 36 acres employing 1 man and 1 boy, b Cottenham

 

Thomas Chivers, 34, brewer and coal merchant, b Cottenham


1881:

Mary Munsey, 61, basketmaker, b Cottenham

 

Elizabeth Chivers, 47, landowner, b Cottenham

Louisa Morgan, boarder, 27, certificated schoolmistress, b Surrey

Edith K Morgan, boarder, 2, b Middlesex

 

Jonathan Piggott, 74, farmer of 29 acres, b Cottenham


1891:

Mary Munsey, 69, partner in the basket making trade

 

Eliza Chivers, 54, living on her own means, b Cottenham

 

Emma Crop, 51, gardener, b Cottenham


1901:

Mary Munsey, 79, basket maker, b Cottenham

 

Eliza Chivers, 67, living on her own means

 

Ellis C Munsey, 55, basket maker and gardener, b Cottenham


1911:

Ellis Charles Munsey, 66, basket maker and gardener, b Cottenham


1939: (161)

(161) Arthur Barnes, b 1891, packer food processing factory

 

(161a) Charles E Benerson, b 1884, lorry driver haulage


Modern: (233)

 

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