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The Moat Newmarket Road

Paper Mills, The Moat, Newmarket Road

History of Paper Mills, Newmarket Road

Royal Commission Survey of Cambridge 1959: it was built early in the 18th century and consists of a long rectangular range at right angles to the Newmarket Road. Alterations were made early in the 19th century and subsequently a wing and various small additions were built on the E. The mill adjoining on the N, presumably a rebuilding of an older mill, is dated 1871. Fuller writing in 1662 says paper was made here ‘in memory of our fathers’. Subsequently it seems to have been used as a flour mill until affected by reduction in the flow of the brook resulting from extraction by the Waterworks Company who bought the freehold.

A B Gray, Cambridge Revisited, noted in 1921 the attractive garden here. He writes that the old building had been used as a flour mill until the water supply was interrupted.

1901: Fen Ditton

John James, 51, machinist letting out threshing machines, b Fen Ditton

………..

1913: The Moat

Francis George Blandford

…………

1939:

(a) Hector Chadwick, b 1870, professor of Anglo Saxon

Hector Munro Chadwick, Paper Mills Newmarket Road

Norah Kershaw, b 1891

Nora Kershaw Chadwick, Paper Mills Newmarket Road

(b)

Sarkis Topalian, b 1892,  lecturer School of Oriental Studies

Satenik, b 1896

?

Sylvia, b 1925

?

May, b 1928

………..

1950s: house was lived in by Nan Youngman and Betty Rea.

Nan Youngman

https://www.invaluable.com/artist/youngman-nan-96r2794mse/sold-at-auction-prices/

Betty Rea was an acquaintance of Desmond Bernal; she created the statue of the three bronze swimmers outside Cambridge’s Parkside swimming pool. She taught at Homerton College between 1949 and 1964.

Betty Rea (Homerton College)

Betty Rea

The Swimmers by Betty Rea

https://picturesforschools.wordpress.com/tag/cambridge-society-of-painters-and-sculptors/

………….

1962: Paper Mills

Mrs Rea

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