Capturing Cambridge
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St Andrew's Street nos 26 - 30

29 St Andrew’s Street

History of 29 St Andrew's Street

1851: unnumbered

Frederick Mortlock, 33, bookmaker, b Cambridge

Mary Ann, 30, b Cambridge

Ellen, 6, b Cambridge

Philip, 4, b Cambridge

Frederick, 2, b Cambridge

William, 1 m, b Cambridge

Sarah Roberts, 17, servant, b Thetford

………….

1861:

Anthony Phillips, 22, undergraduate at St Catherine College, b Cambridge

Martha, sister, 25, shopwoman, b Cambridge

Elizabeth M, sister, 16, apprentice, b Cambridge

May Susannah, sister in law, 65, formerly ladys maid, b Kings Ripton

Harriett Constable, 16, house servant, b Toft

John Lloyd Griffith, 22, lodger, batchelor of arts, b Anglesea

………….

1871:

Thomas Saunders, 63, hair cutter and perfumer, b Cambridge

Elina, 61, b Cambridge

Sarah Stretch, sister, 62, independent, b Cambridge

Clara Stretch, niece, 37, assistant, b Cambridge

Alfred Saunders, 32, hair cutter and a volunteer, b Cambridge

…………..

1881: tailors shop

Thomas Holdsworth, 53, tailor, b Ipswich

Sarah J, 50, b Suffolk

Katherine C, 24, b Cambridge

Alfred J, 19, tailor, b Cambridge

Eliza Webb, 14, servant, b Six Mile Bottom

Harrold Moore, lodger, 22, student, b Liverpool

Stuart Bruce, visitor, 22, student, b Woolwich

………….

1891:?

1901: –

1911: –

1913:

Scruby and Gray, auctioneers

R C Burrows solicitor and Clerk of the the Peace for the Borough of Cambridge

1962:

Gray, Swann and Cook surveyors

Hundred Houses Society

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