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8 Cavendish Avenue, Deepdene

History of 8 Cavendish Avenue

1901

Mary C Gould, wife, 47 born Philadelphia USA

Lorna R, 16, born Hull

John R, 14, born York

George D, 9, born Norwich

Janet E, 5, born Cambridge

Gabriela M Percy, 25, Lady Help, born Derbyshire

Mary E Blows, 25, Cook, born Bassingbourne

Annie D Levett, 20, Housemaid, born Buckden

1911

Frederick William Worsley 37, born Singapore, clergyman of the established church

Catherine Ethel 37, born Calcutta

Francis Frederick 8, born London

Elizabeth Mary 6, born London

William Lister 4, born Lincs.

Thomas Cuthbert 3, born Durham

Katherine Douglas, 30, born Glasgow, employee, nursery governess

Katie Violet Norman, 27 born Durham, servant, cook

Bernie Johnson, servant, 21, born Exning, housemaid

F W Worsley was Dean of Llandaff from 1926 until 1929. He was educated at Clare College Cambridge and ordained in 1898. After curacies in Barnes and South Kensington, he was vicar of Corringham. He was on the staff of St Michael’s College Llandaff from 1914-1926 during which time he was also a Chaplain to the Forces from 1915-1919.

His writings include ‘The Theology of the Church of England’ (pub. unknown).


WWI – Mrs Zieglar volunteered for the Red Cross from 1916-1919 at the 1st Eastern General. This was probably Ida b.1875, who had previously lived in Rathmore Road.

…………………..

1941

Michael Bowyer in Air Raid! pub. 1986 notes that incendiary bombs which fell in the raid of 9th May 1941 caused fires at nos 8 and 10 Cavendish Avenue which needed the services of the fire service to put out.

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