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Victoria Avenue (West side)

History of Victoria Avenue (West side)

1913:

VICTORIA BRIDGE

William Dunn, River View

William Dunn, painter, glazier, ironmonger

Co-operative Society Confectionery Branch, Miss Lawrence, manageress

John Start, cabinet maker

Arthur Barron, stables, furniture remover

CHESTERTON ROAD

……………….

1937:

(8) A E Page, provision dealers

(10) A S Whitehead, greengrocers

(12) Thomas William Etchells, cycle dealer

John George Start, furniture dealer

(18) Cambridge and District Co-op Society Ltd

……………

1939-45:

The Suttles used the air raid shelter of Overstream House. They paid £5 for the privilege.

……………..

1970:

(8) I A Parfitt, outfitter

(10)

(12) Cherry Hinton Launderettes

(14/16) Cambridge Trustee Savings Bank

(18) Cambridge Trustee Savings Bank, head office

(20 River View) Reginald W Suttle

…………….

1981:

(20 River View) Reginald Suttle was interviewed by the CWN (23.4). He and his wife Dorothy had lived at no.20, River View, for more than 40 years. Mrs Suttle remembered that Victoria Bridge was opened on the same day that her parents were married. Mr Suttle’s father was a shipping agent in Fitzroy Street. He went with his father to have lunch on the Titanic in Liverpool the day before her tragic maiden voyage.

River View in 1981 was the property of the Co-op Soc. The Suttles used to have a garden of roses and dahlias behind the big house that was replaced by Barclays Bank.

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