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11 Ainsworth Street

House painter

Number 11 is one of a terrace of four houses on the west side of Ainsworth Street.

1881 – 1891

William Lanham, a house painter from Cambridge, lived here with his wife Rebecca (nee Wbb) and their family.  William and Rebecca married at St Andrew the Less on the 28th July 1839. He is the son of a painter and she is the daughter of a brickmaker from West Wickham.

In 1881 they were living with their daughter Lucy (39), a dressmaker, their sons Edmond John (31) a baker and Walter (26) a printer.  Their grandson, 3-year-old Harry, also lived with them.

By 1891 Walter has moved out, but the other members of the family rmain at number 11.  Harry is now a Machine Boy.

The 1891 Census was taken on the 5th April. William died shortly afterwards and was buried at St Andrew the Less on the 22nd April 1891.

1901

Henry Ward, a 34-year-old blacksmith from Hardwick is head of household in 1901. He married Emma Rebecca Royston in 1902 and they have two children, George and Horace.

Henry and Emma are buried in Mill Road Cemetery.

1911

Thomas Herbert Clark & Florence Ellen (nee Tabor) and their four children. In 1912 their son, Stanley Bernard, is born. He lives at number 3 in the 1950s & 1960s.

Sources

UK census records (1881 to 1911), Cambridgeshire Marriages, National Burial Index For England & Wales, England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1837-1915, Mill Road Cemetery,

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