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36 Ainsworth Street

G.E.R. & a Sapper with the Royal Engineer's

Number 36 is one of a terrace of five houses standing on the east side of Ainsworth Street.

1881

Andrew Bareford, 26, Engine Cleaner on GER, b. Swaffham Bulbeck, Cambridgeshire

Ellen E Bareford, 24, b. Cambridge

Florence E Bareford, 4, b. Swaffham Bulbeck, Cambridgeshire

Charles Bareford, 2, b. Cambridge

Joseph Newman, 18, Lodger, Pilotman on GER, b. Fingringhoe, Essex

Frederic Martin, 28, Lodger, Fireman on Railway, b. Cambridge

1891 – 1945

Head of Household is George James Houghton, a 29-year-old, striker labourer, which means he works for a blacksmith. He previously lived at 12 Sturton Street.

George married Eliza Sanderson in West Wratting on the 24th March 1883. She is now 30.  There have two children in 1891, four year old Maud and 5-month-old Frank

In 1901 George is now a striker on the Great Eastern Railway.  No longer a labourer, which suggests he is moving up the ranks.  Maud, now 14, does Press Work.

By 1911 George is still a blacksmith’s striker for the GER. Maud is now a Tailoress (recorded as “Ethel Maud”) and Frank is a Baker’s Assistant. The family have a boarder, Christopher White, 23, he’s a Night Watchman at the Chemists.

Frank serves with the Royal Engineers as a Sapper during World War 1. During his Service he marries Dorothy Ida Flock. They both give Adam and Eve Row as their address, and Dorothy then lives at 1 Sturton Street.

George died in 1927, still living at number 36.

Eliza Houghton remains at the property at least until 1939, where she appears on the 1939 Register with her daughter Ethel White (who is now 52 and no longer called Maud) and Roy White (23), a commercial motor mechanic.

Eliza died in November 1945 and is recorded as being “of 36 Ainsworth Street”.

Sources

UK Census, 1881, 1891, 1901, 1911, Cambridgeshire Marriages, British Army WWI Service Records, 1914-1920, Cambridgeshire Burials, 1939 Register

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