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5 Ainsworth Street

A Bricklayer and a member of the R.A.M.C.

Number 5 Ainsworth Street is one of a terrace of three houses on the west side of Ainsworth Street.

1891

42-year-old widowed Charwoman Hannah Vail (nee Andrews) is living at number 5 with her 8 children. Catherine (18), Roseannah (17), a tailoress, Florence (15), a domestic servant, Alice (13), Percy (7) a scholar, William (6) a scholar, Sidney (4) a scholar and 2-year-old Claude. Hannah and her two eldest children are from Great Abington. The other children were all born in Cambridge.

Hannah appears on the 1881 Census living at number 20. Her husband, Henry, a bricklayer, is alive at this point. He dies in 1889, aged 39 and is buried at St Andrew the Less.

The family have moved to number 10 by 1901 [see number 10 for more information about this family] and will move to number 25 by 1905.

1901 – 1935

Harry Mallion and his wife Louisa (nee Downs) are now resident at number 5. He is a brewer’s assistant from Fen Ditton. Harry and Louisa married in the Zion Baptist Chapel in December 1899. Their son, Austin Charles, is born in 1901 and their daughter, Emily Alice, in 1908.

Austin is baptised in Sudbury, Suffolk on the 27th October 1901. He stays with his parents at number 5 until his marriage to Doris Webb in 1932.

In June 1918 Harry joins the Royal Army Medical Corps, he gives his Trade as “Cook”, he is 43. He is sent to France at the end of September 1918 and is there until August 1919. During this time, he is assigned to the 62nd Casualty Clearing Station

The Cambridge Directory of 1935 shows Harry still living at number 5, he’s a baker.

1938 onwards

Garage storekeeper, Stanley Arthur Cowell, is living at number 5 in 1938 with his wife Lillian (nee Human), and their daughter Thelma Daisy (8 years old, at school) have moved to Ainsworth Street from Cherry Hinton.

They remain at number 5 until, at least, 1967 where Stanley’s name appears in the 1967 Kelly’s Directory.

Sources

UK census records (1881 to 1911), General Register Office birth, marriage and death indexes (1837 onwards), the 1939 England and Wales Register, Cambridge Directory (1935), The Blue Book Cambridge Directory (1938), British Army WW1 Service Records 1914-1920, RAMC in the Great War, The Long, Long Trail, Kelly’s Directory of Cambridgeshire (1967), and Cambridgeshire, England, Electoral Registers, Burgess Rolls and Poll Books (1914-1966)

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