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5-6 Trinity Street

History of 5-6 Trinity Street

1761

At approx. this location Woollard business was based. Family records state that it was 4 Trinity Street.The Woollards were a family who traced their origin to the early 17th cent in West Wratting. Their business started as a grocers but was extended to include fine china and glass.

Gilbert Woollard (b.1722 d.1759) was the son of Daniel and Elizabeth (née Bell) of West Wratting. He married in 1759 Joanna Campin of Cambridge at St Clements. Their son Gilbert (1760-1825 joined the Cambridgeshire Regiment Militia, rose to Paymaster, and served for over 40 years through the Napoleonic Wars.

William Hanchett Hattersley (1819-1902) was the son of Thomas Hattersley who had married Mary Ann Woollard (daughter of Gilbert Woollard (1760 -1825). After his parents had died he was brought to Cambridge by Mary and Ann Woollard c.1833/4 to live with them and enter the family business.

William Hatchett Hattersley (1819-1902) was a benefactor of St Mary’s. His family lived from 1877 to 1917 at Camden House, on Parker’s Piece.

1795

Gilbert Woollard bequeathed grocer business to his daughters Anna and Mary, later joined by his granddaughter Elizabeth.

William Hanchett Hattersley (1819-1902) was the son of Thomas Hattersley who had married Mary Ann Woollard (daughter of Gilbert Woollard (1760 -1825). After his parents had died he was brought to Cambridge by Mary and Ann Woollard c.1833/4 to live with them and enter the family business.

1850

By c.1850 William Hanchett Hattersley was head of the business and moved it up-market including china, glass an fine wines, built up a clientele that included the Prince of Wales when an undergraduate at Trinity College.

The Cambridge ale jug was found in digging the foundations of Hattersley Bros (grocers) in 1850.

Cambridge ale jug, found 1850, Trinity Street

Record of Cambridge Ale Jug, found 1850, Trinity Street

In 2017 Imogen Gunn of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, confirmed that this was a 14th century jug. The business had seen this a marketing opportunity and in collaboration with Wedgwood produced a range of different sized replicas of the jug under the name ‘Cambridge Ale Jug.’ The bases were stampled ‘Cambridge Ale Jug – sold by – Wollard & Co.’

Cambridge Ale Jug replica

Cambridge Ale Jug replicas

1871

William H Hattersley, 52, grocer china glass dealer (empl. 8 persons), b Ely

Ann Edwards, friend, 68, widow, housekeeper, b Godmanchester

G W Hattersley, nephew, 16, clerk, b Stafford

Elizabeth Stubbings, 19, cook, b Gt Wilbraham

Esther Webb, 19, housemaid, b Cambs

William Maul, 14, house boy, b Cambridge

5 – 6 Trinity Street, Hattersley’s © Museum of Cambridge

5 – 6 Trinity Street, Hattersley’s © Museum of Cambridge


1877

The Hattersley family moved to Camden House. Family notes state that W H Hattersley was described as ‘an intelligent  and culture man, a friend of his neighbours in Trinity Street, the booksellers Alexander and Daniel Macmillan.’ He was particularly interested in the School of Art for which he raised a large sum of money. he was a patron of Charles Brock who became an illustrator of Macmillan’s books. he served on the committee of the Free Library, was on the board of Addenbrooke’s Hospital and had a deep concern for the Waifs’ and Strays’ Home.

William Hatchett Hattersley was a benefactor of St Mary’s. His family lived from 1877 to 1917 at Camden House, on Parker’s Piece.

 

1881


1891

Gilbert Woollard Hattersley, 36, grocer, b Staffs

Hermine A R, 30, b Germany

Gilbert R, 6,

Harold W, 4,

Ada Brown, 21, servant,

Emma Brown, 20

1901

Gilbert Woollard Hattersley

Hermine Roeper

Gilbert Roeper

Harold Woollard

May Murdoch, cook

Kate Dilley, servant

In 1911 the family were living at Camden House

1911

(5)

Frederick Johnson, 37, college servant, b Wicken

Sophia, 37, b Wicken

Reginald, 14, b Chesterton


1913

Hattersley Bros., grocers, china, glass, and lamp depot, wine, spirit, and bottle beer merchants

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