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28 Hooper Street

A wood carver, a gamekeeper, a tea salesman and a lorry driver

28 Hooper Street is one of a terrace of five houses on the south side of Hooper Street.

1881

The first inhabitants were John Mitchell, his wife Emma, their three children William, Amy and Frederick, and Emma’s mother Sarah White. John was born in rural Bedfordshire in 1840, and gives his occupation as wood carver. Ten years earlier, when he and Emma lived in Fenny Stratford, Buckinghamshire, his occupation was iron moulder. It is possible that he carved wood patterns for cast iron moulds at Headly’s iron foundry.

By 1901 John and Emma had left the city for the village of Gamlingay, where John worked as a self-employed wood carver. In 1911 they were living near Ampthill, Bedfordshire. Curiously, John gives his occupation as ‘American Navy pensioner’. Perhaps he spent time in the United States in the early 1860s, when he seems to be absent from the UK census records.

1891

In 1891 the inhabitants were George and Harriett Bayley and their baby daughter Mary. George was a gamekeeper from West Yorkshire, and Harriett was from Great Wilbraham.

1901 and 1911

In 1901 and 1911 the inhabitants were Richard Peers Stiles, his wife Alice, and three children still at home – William, Clifton and Donald. In 1901 Richard’s occupation is ‘tea traveller’ – a commercial salesman. In 1911 he gives his occupation as grocer’s assistant. William was also a grocer’s assistant, Clifton became a tailor, and by 1911 Donald was a printer and compositor. The family were still at the address in 1920.

1939

By 1939 the inhabitants were lorry driver Albert Sanderson and his wife Violet. They were still at the address in 1966.

Sources

UK census records (1841 to 1911), General Register Office birth, marriage and death indexes (1837 onwards), the 1939 England and Wales Register, and electoral registers.

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